July 4th Fireworks and Your Pets

On this day, more than any other day of the year, your dog[s] need and deserve your attention, protection and understanding.

When it comes to your dog[s] ~ fireworks can be terrifying.    It’s the explosive noises that cannot be tolerated by their sensitive ears.

Did You Know?   Dogs can hear noises up to 1/4 mile away.

**According to the Pet Amber Alert, the Fourth of July is a time of year that record the most dogs running away to escape ~ and often, from blindly running, they run into traffic and are killed by traffic..

 

1.  DO NOT Take Your Dog[s] to a Fireworks Display, Ever ~ from ANY distance!

2. Keep Your Dog Home ~ with all Doors and Windows Shut

When a dog hears a sudden loud noise, his instinct may be to bolt. It’s important to double-check that doors, windows, and backyard gates are secured before the fireworks show starts. Close your curtains and blinds to block out flashing lights.

3.  Double-Check Your Pets are wearing their ID Tags

Make sure every dog has proper identification tags on their collars so if  they do escape from your home, car or property they can be identified and returned.

4. Don’t leave your dog unleashed in any open space, even your fenced back yard.

5.  Exercise them hourse before Fireworks are scheduled . Wear Them Out! :Exercise them into a healthy exhaustion.

:On the day of, take your dog[s] on an extra long walk before the festivities begin.

:Tire them out mentally by working on a new trick or playing simple games like hide and seek. The more mellowed out your dog is once the fireworks shows starts, the better.

6.  Provide Distractions

When fireworks are going off, try and redirect your dog’s attention by throwing their favorite ball or toy ~ inside only please. Doing so distracts your dog and can help him/her associate fireworks with something positive like playing.

Another great trick is to keep a Kong toy stuffed with frozen peanut butter handy, as it’ll give your dog something else to focus on during the fireworks.

7.  Don’t Push Your Dog Past Their Comfort Zone

If your dog runs and hides under the bed, let him/her be.
Don’t force him/her out or push him/her closer to the fireworks in an attempt to get him/her used to the sounds. Instead, have a quiet, dark room prepared for your pooch.

Keep the windows shut and play some soothing music so your dog knows he has a place to go to if he’s stressed out.

You can also try to drown out some of the sound using white noise from a fan, TV, or radio.

8.  Desensitize your Dog to the Sound of Fireworks:

A few days before the 4th begin playing some recorded sounds of fireworks at low volume a few times a day. Pair the sound of fireworks with things your dog likes such as treats, hugs, meals, or walks. Gradually raise the sound of the fireworks until your dog is comfortable listening to the sound of fireworks at full volume.

9.  Try a ‘Thunder Shirt’

ThunderShirts work for some, but not all dogs.  A pricey investment, but can be effective.

These shirts work just like a hug, providing constant pressure so your dog feels safe and secure. It creates a calming effect on anxious, fearful, or overexcited dogs.  Works well during thunderstorms as well, hence the name!

Don’t Change Your Behavior and Stay Calm

When dogs are spooked by loud noises, they get anxious. When that happens, our first instinct is to comfort the dog by babying them—speaking in a soothing voice, picking them up. Yet instead of calming a dog down, this can often reinforce their fearful behavior. Dogs pay very close attention to our body language so if you stay calm, it signals that there’s nothing to be afraid of. Try speaking to your dog as your normally do, with an even tone, and act as if everything is normal.

Don’t Push Your Dog Past Their Comfort Zone

If your dog runs and hides under the bed, let him/her be.
Don’t force him/her out or push him/her closer to the fireworks in an attempt to get him/her used to the sounds. Instead, have a quiet, dark room prepared for your pooch.

Keep the windows shut and play some soothing music so your dog knows he has a place to go to if he’s stressed out.

You can also try to drown out some of the sound using white noise from a fan, TV, or radio.

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