Origin 

England

Personality

Turkish Vans are very adaptable and good-natured ~  which makes her the ideal family companion. Although she loves attention from her people, including children, the American Shorthair does not like being carried and is fairly independent. She may curl up in your lap on occasion, but she may prefer to sit alongside you instead.

Turkish Vans get along fine with a cat-friendly dog, but her hunting instincts may take over with pet birds and other small animals.

This sweet, loving breed likes to be involved in whatever is going on and enjoys curling up on a lap. A slow-maturing breed, the Turkish Van takes three to five years to reach maturity.

Gorgeous, graceful, athletic, and intelligent, the Turkish Van cat is a suitable companion for adult owners. Despite it being an affectionate cat, it is independent and loves to have a space of its own.

  • It is an independent feline that enjoys its own space.
  • It is a fur ball of energy that loves playing with water, jumping at great heights and running around the house.
  • It requires minimal grooming.

With its water-resistant coat, the Turkish Van cat enjoys the rain and water. If it is not following its owner around, it may be busy exploring taps in the bathroom or playing on a sink in the kitchen. This fur ball is full of energy and loves to jump, climb and play retrieving and chasing games. It is also known for its love of heights. As a result, it can often be found perched up in high areas of the room. However, this playful feline is a bit clumsy that would frequently bump into things and unintentionally knock them over.

This feline might not be right if you are looking for a lap cat. It may be affectionate but it does not like to be picked up or cuddled a lot. It is an independent cat that loves to have its own space. Its interaction with people or with other animals should be on its own terms. It will attach itself to its chosen human who tends to its care. It can also be quite vocal producing a unique sound that resembles the sound of a sheep.

History

It is believed that the first recorded Turkish Van cat dates back to 1600-1200 BC. It is said to have semi-longhaired coats with ringed tails and coloured heads. Different forms of art have proved its presence in the ancient times, including carvings in pieces of jewellery, battle standard, and figurines.

Different forms of art have proved its presence in the ancient times. The Van cat’s origin in modern history has been well documented as well. The breed originated in the Lake Van of Turkey. In 1954, Journalist Laura Lushington and photographer Sonia Halliday were given two Turkish Van kittens (a male and a female) which they successfully imported to Britain. The female soon produced a litter of kittens having the ‘van patterning’ which refers to its distinctive ‘top-and-tail’ markings.

For years, other breeders supported Lushington in her quest for breed recognition in the UK.
In 1959, Lushington and Halliday returned to Turkey to obtain two more kittens. From then on, they established a careful documentation of its breeding program.

 

Did You Know?

The Turkish Van cat is a naturally occurring ancient breed believed to have existed amongst the animals saved in the Ark of Noah. Legend has it that when the boat reached Mount Ararat in eastern Turkey, the cats hopped off the boat and swam searching for signs of the shore. It was believed to have been blessed by God whose divine touch left a coloured marking on their white coats called ‘thumbprint of God’. It is believed to bring good luck.

Known as the ‘Turkish swimming cat’, the Turkish Van cat loves to play with water. It has the tendency to turn on the faucet on its own. As such, Turkish Van owners should be extra careful with the source of water when leaving this cat alone.

Did you know cat hair isn’t the cause of reactions by people sensitized to cat allergens? The primary cause is an allergen produced in cats’ saliva.   These allergens are spread to cats’ hair through grooming, which are then shed into the environment.

Appearance & Coat

The Turkish Van is distinguished by their chalk-white body and colored markings on the head and long, plumed tail. This curious feline has powerful hind legs that allow her to jump on otherwise hard-to-reach spaces.

Coat:  Semi-long, fine, cashmere-like

The sweet, loving breed likes to be involved in whatever is going on and enjoys curling up on a lap. A slow-maturing breed, the Turkish Van takes three to five years to reach maturity.

On average, the Turkish Van cat lifespan ranges from 12 to 14 years.

This cat breed is among the healthiest and is not known to be affected by hereditary health issues.

 

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